September 22, 2019

Increased Regulation is Necessary for Homeschooling -

Thursday, August 29, 2019

An amazing year for the wrestling team -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

My Experience at the Women’s March -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

El Regreso Del Racismo -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Parkland Shooting -

Friday, March 2, 2018

California Flu Crisis -

Friday, March 2, 2018

‘Rapping’ Up the Grammy Awards -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

¿Cuál Será el Futuro de DACA? -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Peters traded to the Rams -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018 Upcoming Movies -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Instagram-Worthy Desserts of San Francisco -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Upcoming Season of Baseball -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Black History Month -

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Black Panther Review -

Friday, February 23, 2018

The Destructive Culture of Social Media -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Badminton season launches into action! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

LimeBike Takes Over! -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

All Star Weekend Highlights -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Chinese New Year Brought to SMHS -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Seems as if Presentation is Everything

Have you ever felt that your teacher graded you unfairly? Say you may have “copied” from a friend and you two get different grades. Why? Does your teacher just hate you? Perhaps you are one of the many guilty of messy handwriting.

Senior Travis Russo conducted an experiment to find out whether handwriting (messy and neat) or typed assignments got different grades.

He created three test groups, with ten teachers in each group, giving a grand total of 30 teachers.

He then asked all teachers were asked to grade a vocabulary list, each definition for every term exactly the same, down to the last word. Each definition was taken directly from the dictionary with no difference. All lists had the word ‘discipline,’ as Travis felt that was a word every teacher should be able to define.

The first group was given a neatly handwritten vocabulary list; the second a messy, almost illegible list and the last group was given the typed version.

The teachers were told to check off boxes for the grade they thought the assignment deserved. “A” was for a perfect vocabulary list with no errors and definitions that could be put in the dictionary. On the other side of the spectrum, an “F” list was supposed to be given to a list that didn’t even have the correct definition. The grade average for the typed paper was a “B,” neat handwriting “C” and messy handwriting a “C-.”

“The results were hilarious,” said Travis Russo, “There was a huge bias among the teachers depending the on the state of the paper turned in.”

The inspiration for the experiment came to Travis when he had a group assignment in his class.

The teacher required two copies, so Travis and his partner turned in the exact same words on a sheet of paper, the only difference being the quality of their handwriting. Travis got a B while his partner got an A. Not fully understanding the reason behind the difference in grading, he decided to put it to the test.

This goes farther than handwriting. People are often told to dress up for job interviews – as the saying goes, “Dress for success.” Your writing, fashion and even the way you walk broadcasts yourself. That just goes to show

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone