December 10, 2019

With Christmas Comes Nostalgia -

Monday, December 9, 2019

November Book Recommendations -

Monday, December 9, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Cut For Bieber

Photos suggesting that Justin Bieber was smoking marijuana at a party, the hashtag #cuttinfforbieber, a started a protest against the star’s drug use by way of self-injury, started appearing up all over Twitter on Monday.

First, it appeared as if teens were cutting themselves as a way to voice their disapproval2 of Bieber’s supposed actions. Twitter users to used the hashtag alongside pictures of arms with cuts. Later, the news outlet announced that it tracked the hashtag’s origins to 4Chan and suggested the posts and the photos were all a hoax.

The hashtag began trending nationally within just a few hours, and the response was off the charts. Some users clearly believed the trend was real and made jokes about people who cut themselves, while others notified the practice and calling fans cutting to protest Bieber’s supposed actions disturbing.

Janis Whitlock, a Cornell University professor who has studied teens and self-injury, told The Huffington Post that images of cutting could potentially serve as triggers for those who are already vulnerable or prone to self-injury.

“In the 1990s, there were 14 pop icons that came out and talked about cutting,” Whitlock said. “They weren’t necessarily advocating it, but they talked about it as part of their history and that really did make a difference in terms of getting it out there into the world as an idea that was then available to young people.”

While the hashtag is not likely to attract a new wave of people to the practice, Whitlock ssays it reinforces the idea of self-injury as a method of expression.

“Ideas are as contagious as germs,” she said.

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