December 12, 2019

With Christmas Comes Nostalgia -

Monday, December 9, 2019

November Book Recommendations -

Monday, December 9, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Drip, Drop, California

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As many people know, California is suffering from a severe drought. This is has been the biggest drought since California became a state in 1849, and has affected everyone in the Golden State.

Governor Jerry Brown has issued a state of emergency on January 17 due to the drought. People have been trying their best to conserve water by taking shorter showers or doing the laundry as few times as possible.

“My dad sometimes forces me to take army showers because of the drought!” said Eric Duerr, freshman.

“I try my best to save water. Easier said than done,” Takuya Miwa, sophomore.

Californian farmers have been struggling to grow fruits and vegetables because of their lack water. Crops in the fields are drying up due to the lack of water. And though it is currently winter, it is still growing season for some vegetables such as cauliflower, beets, and carrots.

Trees and plants are also becoming very dry, making a majority of California vulnerable to wildfires. The large Rim Fire in Sierra Nevada last year was ignited by an out of control campfire and rapidly spread through 257,135 acres. Firefighters took two long and hard-working months to extinguish the crispy plants. According to the Huffingtonpost, California firefighters responded to 406 wildfires in 2013 compared to the state average of 69 wildfires per year.

Luckily, California has been preparing for the worst. California’s Department of Resources has kept a “ hidden source of water” from times when there was an excess of water–enough to last for a couple years, according to a report from the Department of Resources. However, it is still necessary to try to conserve water.

Some ways people can conserve water are by turning off the faucet whilst scrubbing hands with soap, brushing your teeth, washing dishes, or simply taking shorter showers. People may also make sure that their load of dirty clothes are full so that the laundry machine will run as few times as possible. Also, if your parents allow you, if it’s yellow let it mellow; if it’s brown flush it down. Water is an extremely valuable resource. Don’t take it for granted.

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  • Residential water usage accounts for approximately 10% of all water used in the state of california. 90% of water usage is in agriculture.

    Of residential water usage approximately 50-80% of that is in the form of landscaping. Changing your shower routines would change your total water use by less than 5% and, if implemented by everyone in the state, would only reduce our total water use by less than 1%. The real problem lies with our state’s agricultural industry.