December 10, 2019

With Christmas Comes Nostalgia -

Monday, December 9, 2019

November Book Recommendations -

Monday, December 9, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Late Start Days: Yay or Nay?

Students mill around the courtyard: some are eating breakfast, some are chatting in little groups, and some are still frantically finishing homework. It’s bright and sunny, and most students are already wide-awake, grateful for the extra two hours of sleep that they managed to sneak in. For the first time this year, San Mateo High started school at ten instead of eight, on August 26 and 27.

“It was easier to wake up, get to school, and be focused in class,” said Ralph Haddad, freshman.

For many students, the late start days offered a chance to sleep in, have breakfast with friends, and finish homework. Many students found it easier to get to school on time, and they were able to leave the house without rushing through their morning routines.

While students were snoozing in bed, or catching up on homework, teachers and staff were all gathered in the school library, busy working on a WASC mid-year report to renew San Mateo High’s accreditation. WASC stands for the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, and San Mateo High School is an accredited public school under WASC’s Accrediting Commission for Schools (ACS). According to the ACS WASC website, officials come to visit the school every six years to determine if there is the “capacity, commitment, and competence to support high-quality student learning.”

It doesn’t appear that there will be any WASC meetings anytime in the near future. For students who hope to have more late start days later this year, the answer may be disappointing. “This year, we do not plan on having any more late start days,” informs Mr. Boise. However, according to Mr. Boise, the late start days were popular with staff who enjoyed having larger chunks of time to work on big projects like WASC. “In future years, if we have big items to tackle, maybe,” says Mr. Boise.

In a poll done to find out whether students preferred late start days or super minimum days,

32 out of a total of 67 students preferred the late start days (48%), and 29 preferred super minimum days (43%). Six couldn’t make up their minds and chose both (9%).

It is nice to have “some days with more time in the morning, but also some days with more time after school for sports, other activities, or loads of homework,” comments Rachel Kirkes, sophomore, who prefers alternating super minimum and late start days.

And as for switching super minimum days to late start days? Well, “the Administration does not have the discretion to change the minimum days following Back to School Night and Open House,” explains Ms. Shiu.

For now, it looks like school will continue to start at eight o’clock sharp for students and staff alike. So until the weekend arrives, we’ll just have to struggle to actually get out of bed without hitting the snooze button more than twice.

In a poll of 67 students, 32 preferred the late start days (48%),  29 preferred super minimum days (43%), and six  chose both (9%).  Ellen Zhu (sophomore) rests during class.

In a poll of 67 students, 32 preferred the late start days (48%), 29 preferred super minimum days (43%), and six chose both (9%).
Ellen Zhu (sophomore) rests during class.

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