September 22, 2019

Increased Regulation is Necessary for Homeschooling -

Thursday, August 29, 2019

An amazing year for the wrestling team -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

My Experience at the Women’s March -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

El Regreso Del Racismo -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Parkland Shooting -

Friday, March 2, 2018

California Flu Crisis -

Friday, March 2, 2018

‘Rapping’ Up the Grammy Awards -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

¿Cuál Será el Futuro de DACA? -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Peters traded to the Rams -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018 Upcoming Movies -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Instagram-Worthy Desserts of San Francisco -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Upcoming Season of Baseball -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Black History Month -

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Black Panther Review -

Friday, February 23, 2018

The Destructive Culture of Social Media -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Badminton season launches into action! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

LimeBike Takes Over! -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

All Star Weekend Highlights -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Chinese New Year Brought to SMHS -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Please Go to the Doc

IMeaslesn 1971, the Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccine became available to American citizens, and by 2000, America proudly proclaimed that endemic measles had been eradicated from the USA.

But in Dec. 2014, a new outbreak of the measles, centered at the Disneyland amusement park in Anaheim, California, reminded the rest of the country of the importance of vaccinations. Ironically, “the happiest place on Earth” has brought both fear and panic to the West Coast, inciting debate and controversy over the measles vaccination.

From Dec. 28, 2014 to Feb. 13, 2015, a total of 125 people infected with the measles have been linked to Disneyland. Of these people, a vast majority has not been vaccinated against the measles.

America has slowly fallen behind the rest of the world, with national vaccination rates lagging behind third-world countries like Tanzania, which has a national measles vaccination rate of 99% compared to America’s 91% according to the World Health Organization. Vaccinating against diseases like the measles is no longer just a personal choice.

To prevent measles outbreaks, there needs to be a certain percentage of the population who have been vaccinated against the measles. But since the measles is highly contagious, 92-95% of people need to be vaccinated for the so-called “herd immunity” to be effective, meaning that the USA is not adequately protected against the measles.

And there are individual counties and areas where the vaccination rates are much lower than the herd immunity threshold, such as Okanagon County, Washington (58.5% vaccination rate) and Santa Cruz County, California (83.8% vaccination rate).

Of those who refuse to vaccinate, many still cite the 1998 study done by Dr. Andrew Wakefield, which asserted that the MMR vaccine was linked to autism. But this study has been discredited many times: 10 of the 13 original authors have retracted their findings, the results could not be replicated by Wakefield or others, the journal the study was originally published in retracted the paper, and Wakefield’s medical license was revoked.

Vaccinating against diseases like the measles is no longer just a personal choice–it is a public responsibility to keep the herd immunity above the required threshold and others safe. After all, with great freedom comes great responsibility–and Americans have to pay a price for their freedom.

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