September 22, 2019

Increased Regulation is Necessary for Homeschooling -

Thursday, August 29, 2019

An amazing year for the wrestling team -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

My Experience at the Women’s March -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

El Regreso Del Racismo -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Parkland Shooting -

Friday, March 2, 2018

California Flu Crisis -

Friday, March 2, 2018

‘Rapping’ Up the Grammy Awards -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

¿Cuál Será el Futuro de DACA? -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Peters traded to the Rams -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018 Upcoming Movies -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Instagram-Worthy Desserts of San Francisco -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Upcoming Season of Baseball -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Black History Month -

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Black Panther Review -

Friday, February 23, 2018

The Destructive Culture of Social Media -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Badminton season launches into action! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

LimeBike Takes Over! -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

All Star Weekend Highlights -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Chinese New Year Brought to SMHS -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Iranian-US Negotiations

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Over the course of the past month, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has addressed U.S. Congress several times, in an attempt to influence our foreign policy. The controversy here is that President Obama never invited Netanyahu to speak to Congress.

Throughout this whole event, Senators and President Obama have been involved in a power struggle: does Congress reserve the right to overpower the desires of the President?

This past week has brought new developments in the power-struggle saga. On March 9, a group of 47 Republican Senators, led by Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, sent a letter addressed to “The Islamic Republic of Iran.” In the letter, the Senators overstepped congressional boundaries by attempting to undermine the delicate negotiations taking place between the U.S. and Iran, regarding Tehran’s nuclear program.

The condescending letter began with “you may not fully understand our Constitutional system,” and then proceeded to misinterpret the description of congressional powers. The Senators stated in the letter that any agreement reached without Congress’s approval would just be an executive agreement between President Obama and Ayatollah Khamenei.

However, according to the Senate’s official webpage, “the Senate does not ratify treaties.” It has the power to make suggestions and give its official consent and opinion of any actions taken by President Obama, but treaty ratification doesn’t actually require that the President adopt those opinions. The President can decide against ratifying the treaty.

Despite the fact that the letter humiliated the 47 Republicans who signed it, it also served its purpose in a way. It is a demonstration of partisan posturing, and lack of unity within our government. It shows disrespect for the office of the president, and President Obama in particular.

In response to the letter, Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif submitted a statement that brought up an interesting point: he said, “the world is not the United States, and the conduct of inter-state relations is governed by international law, not US-domestic law.”

Hillary Clinton also responded to the letter by saying, “…and one has to ask, what was the purpose of this letter?” she said. “There appear to be two logical answers. Either these senators were trying to be helpful to the Iranians or harmful to the commander- in-chief in the midst of high-stakes international diplomacy. Either answer does discredit to the letters’ signatories.”

In my opinion, there is simply  no way for us to move forward, and continue to be acknowledged on an international scale, as a unified nation, if we publically demonstrate the gaps between us. It is perfectly reasonable, even necessary, to express different opinions when only dealing with other U.S. politicians, but when we decide to show ourselves internationally, we are no longer Republicans and Democrats, we are Americans, and we need to exhibit a united front.

 

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