September 22, 2019

Increased Regulation is Necessary for Homeschooling -

Thursday, August 29, 2019

An amazing year for the wrestling team -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

My Experience at the Women’s March -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

El Regreso Del Racismo -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Parkland Shooting -

Friday, March 2, 2018

California Flu Crisis -

Friday, March 2, 2018

‘Rapping’ Up the Grammy Awards -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

¿Cuál Será el Futuro de DACA? -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Peters traded to the Rams -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018 Upcoming Movies -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Instagram-Worthy Desserts of San Francisco -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Upcoming Season of Baseball -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Black History Month -

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Black Panther Review -

Friday, February 23, 2018

The Destructive Culture of Social Media -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Badminton season launches into action! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

LimeBike Takes Over! -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

All Star Weekend Highlights -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Chinese New Year Brought to SMHS -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Fiber Competition Rises

GoogleFiber

When Google Fiber was announced several years ago, it was unopposed and ready to gain the support of countless U.S. citizens eager to experience faster internet speeds. Now, competition has finally arrived for Google Fiber, allowing fiber internet to gain the momentum it lost while Google took its time.

Both Comcast and AT&T have announced their own competitors to Google’s fiber service, called Gigabit Pro and GigaPower respectively. This means that fiber internet may appear in new areas as three different companies compete to create a better service than each other. In fact, Comcast’s new service plans to bring a two gigabyte connection to Atlanta, Georgia starting next month. This beats both Google and AT&T’s plans to offer their own services within the same city and should incite them to try harder and open up more services within other cities. In fact, Comcast already plans to bring its fiber connection across the country to about 18 million homes by the end of the year.

This competition between these companies overall means that we, the customer, will receive more options and access to fiber networks in a country notorious for falling behind in internet connection speed in recent years. In fact, to have a 25 megabyte per second connection in San Francisco, it costs an average of $60 while in cities such as London, Seoul, and Paris it costs from $24 to $30. One of the main reasons that this occurs is that America’s big Internet providers usually have a monopoly or duopoly within certain areas so that they stay out of each others way. This means that they can all raise their prices extremely high without having to compete at all.

If fiber internet service works out, it could drastically change the pricing and speed of non-fiber internet because when given the chance many would obviously switch to fiber unless cable connections were made much cheaper. Overall, any new addition to a city’s fiber network or lowering of cable pricing to combat that means better Internet for all of us.

 

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