November 22, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

How Media Affects The Mind -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Matilda Provides Hope -

Monday, October 14, 2019

Can Music Change A Film?

     

          In celebration of the incredibly successful Star Wars VII, an interesting question must be asked. How successful would the Star Wars franchise be if its famous and nostalgic soundtrack was completely different? Does the success of a movie lie within its music?

          Filmmakers apply appropriate music to a scene to help emphasize the tone of the world the movie takes place in. A great example of this is the iconic shower scene from the classic horror film Psycho. Why is that particular scene so famous? The uneasy jarring and jabbing of two notes on a violin creates a disturbing atmosphere of panic as the scene unfolds.

          Of course, movie scores don’t have to contain distinct musical notes. Noise could greatly impact the tension of a scene.  Some composers use low frequency sounds to create fear and tension.  When you watch a horror film in a movie theatre and you feel the ground vibrate, that is the music telling you to feel scared. From a broad perspective, if you were to mute any horror film, it wouldn’t be anywhere near as scary.

One of the most well known composers is John Williams. Over a 60-year career, Williams has worked on Star Wars, Jaws, Harry Potter, and Indiana Jones, and his net worth is at approximately one hundred million dollars. Wow!   

SHEHCanMusicMakeOrBreakAFilm?

          Music has the incredible power of manipulating one’s emotions, and filmmakers use this phenomenon to their advantage.  This was especially the case with Star Wars.  The music bursts with powerful fanfare and beautiful melodies that thrill and leave audiences in awe. The score perfectly reflects what happens on screen, whether it’s an epic lightsaber battle or the mourning of a character’s death. A large part of Star Wars’ epic success lies in the way that the music harmonized perfectly with the audience’s emotions.

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