October 19, 2018

An amazing year for the wrestling team -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

My Experience at the Women’s March -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

El Regreso Del Racismo -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Parkland Shooting -

Friday, March 2, 2018

California Flu Crisis -

Friday, March 2, 2018

‘Rapping’ Up the Grammy Awards -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

¿Cuál Será el Futuro de DACA? -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Peters traded to the Rams -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018 Upcoming Movies -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Instagram-Worthy Desserts of San Francisco -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Upcoming Season of Baseball -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Black History Month -

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Black Panther Review -

Friday, February 23, 2018

The Destructive Culture of Social Media -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Badminton season launches into action! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

LimeBike Takes Over! -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

All Star Weekend Highlights -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Chinese New Year Brought to SMHS -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

The Van Jones Show:Jay-Z -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Doodle 4 Google Contest: “What I See for the Future…”

Clockwise, starting from the top left, are the 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2016 Doodle 4 Google contest winners.

Clockwise, starting from the top left, are the 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2016 Doodle 4 Google contest winners.

Millions of students across the U.S. are busy designing their own Google logo for the annual Doodle 4 Google contest, with the ultimate prize: having their design featured on Google’s home page. This year, the theme is “What I See for the Future…” Any and all students in grades K-12 from all 50 states, Washington, D.C., Guam and Puerto Rico are welcome to use the materials of their choice to create a design expressing their view of the future, as stated on the official Doodle 4 Google website.

To enter, you only have to fill out and submit an entry form with your doodle and a brief description containing no more than 50 words by Dec. 2. “It is a good challenge and it makes people think about an important topic,” said Ms. Julie Stock, an art teacher at SMHS. “I love that anyone can participate; it embodies the concept of the American dream.”

By February next year, the judges will have chosen a winner from each of the 53 states and territories, and the U.S. public will be able to vote for their favorite doodle out of those. These votes will determine the five finalists, from which Google employees will choose a national winner.

Through participating, students can practice “exercising the creative problem-solving part of their brain and spirit; strengthening their determination, grit and resilience to work through a complex project such as this,” said Ms. Stock. She also has some advice for students wishing to compete: “Don’t judge or limit yourself,” she said. “Select one concept and go for it. Really try to make it obvious; you may have to re-do your work several times until it has unity, creativity and visually promotes your idea. You have the potential to say a lot with your visual choices.”

“I am willing to look at any student’s work if they would like feedback,” Ms. Stock added.

All contestants have the chance to win prizes ranging from an Android tablet to a $30,000 scholarship. The State and Territory Winners will have their doodle featured in the Doodle 4 Google gallery and will receive an Android tablet. The national finalists will each receive a $5,000 scholarship and a trip to the Google Headquarters. The national winner will receive the scholarship and have their logo featured on the U.S. Google homepage for one day, along with a $50,000 award gifted to their school or a non-profit organization, a trip to the Google Headquarters here in California and a Chromebook.

The doodles will be judged by artistic skill, creativity and theme communication. Contestants will be scored in five separate age groups.

I’m usually not very creative, but participating in this has really made me surprise myself,” said Lisa Gu, freshman.I’m planning on creating a theme focused on the kind of technology we’ll have in the future; like portals, making 3D reality, and creating laser guns.”  Other creators are looking from more of a social view. “For the future, I envision a world where people of all different backgrounds and lifestyles can work together and coexist peacefully,” said Alyssa Winans, an illustrator and game artist, as stated on the Doodle 4 Google site. Her logo was chosen to be displayed online as an example for other doodlers.

The Doodle 4 Google contest is a huge opportunity for students of all ages to win prizes and try something new. “Don’t limit yourself with a negative attitude,” said Ms. Stock. “I feel disappointed to hear anyone, child or adult, say, ‘I can’t draw’ or ‘I can’t do this’ because we all can draw and create and we all can try. When you go for your best, it also encourages others to do their best. It’s what makes yourself and a community strong.”

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