July 18, 2019

An amazing year for the wrestling team -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

My Experience at the Women’s March -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

El Regreso Del Racismo -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Parkland Shooting -

Friday, March 2, 2018

California Flu Crisis -

Friday, March 2, 2018

‘Rapping’ Up the Grammy Awards -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

¿Cuál Será el Futuro de DACA? -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Peters traded to the Rams -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018 Upcoming Movies -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Instagram-Worthy Desserts of San Francisco -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Upcoming Season of Baseball -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Black History Month -

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Black Panther Review -

Friday, February 23, 2018

The Destructive Culture of Social Media -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Badminton season launches into action! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

LimeBike Takes Over! -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

All Star Weekend Highlights -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Chinese New Year Brought to SMHS -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

The Van Jones Show:Jay-Z -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Electoral College Still Needed?

With the election finally over after long and controversial presidential campaigns, many people either hate or love the electoral college. This system, while outdated, still decides the presidency regardless of the overall popular vote.

First created in 1787 during the Constitutional Convention, the electoral college was designed to give the smaller states more leverage in the elections while still maintaining some popular participation. Along with that it was also designed to separate the presidency from Congress, and prevent the election process from being corrupt.

According the the Constitution each state receives a number of electors equal to the combined total of its Senate membership (two for each state) and number of House of Representatives (currently ranging from one to 52). The 23rd Amendment also provides three electors to the District of Columbia. The number of electoral votes per state currently ranges from three for some of the smallest states to 54 for California, the most populated state.

Every election the debate on whether the electoral college should stay or be replaced comes up, but to each person this depends on which candidate won. Senior Clay Gee says “This system is how they designed it in the beginning and I don’t think we should change it” he also believes “this system allows for more campaigning and it allows smaller states to have a larger impact in the election.”

While some think the system is still needed others like senior Marisa Franke are against this system because in her opinion “it prevents a lot of third party candidates from even having a chance in the election and is a very complicated system, giving a lot of people the idea that their vote doesn’t matter.”

The electoral college should be abolished in favor of a new system that uses real democracy and gives power to the individual rather. This new system should have each voter cast their vote and feel like their vote has value. Using a system of simple majority and popular vote, potential voters will feel that their vote can directly lead to the outcome of the election. Instead of voting republican in a “democratic state” where the vote realistically doesn’t do much they can now have a say in the presidency and not their state.

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