September 26, 2018

An amazing year for the wrestling team -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

My Experience at the Women’s March -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

El Regreso Del Racismo -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Parkland Shooting -

Friday, March 2, 2018

California Flu Crisis -

Friday, March 2, 2018

‘Rapping’ Up the Grammy Awards -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

¿Cuál Será el Futuro de DACA? -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Peters traded to the Rams -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018 Upcoming Movies -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Instagram-Worthy Desserts of San Francisco -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Upcoming Season of Baseball -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Black History Month -

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Black Panther Review -

Friday, February 23, 2018

The Destructive Culture of Social Media -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Badminton season launches into action! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

LimeBike Takes Over! -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

All Star Weekend Highlights -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Chinese New Year Brought to SMHS -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

The Van Jones Show:Jay-Z -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Ms. Casco Helps Students Thrive

Though not many student know her name, she plays a huge role in the San Mateo High School community. She is a caring, selfless member of the staff who helps ELD, or English Language Development, students who struggle with English succeed in class and in life, as well as helping administer testing with the ELD students.

Ms. Casco came to the United States in 1997 from Nicaragua, and she didn’t speak a word of English, so she attended Skyline College in San Bruno to help develop her English skills. In 1997 she got a job at San Mateo High working instructionally to help support her two children and,  “I was so happy when they called me and said ‘yes, we accept you’”.

Maria is now the ELD coordinator at the school, and her duties include placing students with the California English Language development test, or CEL, talking with the students who struggle with English when they need help, and communication with parents who only speak Spanish.  “I try to be the link between the school and the parents,” said Ms. Casco.

“I analyze the student’s grade, I let them know step by step, especially the eld students because the latin america system is so different from the american system”, said Ms. Casco

Often, foreign students have trouble in school because just because it’s just so different from what they are used to. In most Latin American schools, students pass from one grade to another no matter what, unlike in America where students need a certain number of credits.

Most importantly, Ms. Casco makes sure that Spanish speaking students are doing their best and happy. “When they don’t speak the language well, they think they are not good enough. I tell them ‘no’ if you are good, if you are doing your best, nobody is better than your best,” said Ms. Casco.

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