June 18, 2018

An amazing year for the wrestling team -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

My Experience at the Women’s March -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

El Regreso Del Racismo -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Parkland Shooting -

Friday, March 2, 2018

California Flu Crisis -

Friday, March 2, 2018

‘Rapping’ Up the Grammy Awards -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

¿Cuál Será el Futuro de DACA? -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Peters traded to the Rams -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018 Upcoming Movies -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Instagram-Worthy Desserts of San Francisco -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Upcoming Season of Baseball -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Black History Month -

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Black Panther Review -

Friday, February 23, 2018

The Destructive Culture of Social Media -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Badminton season launches into action! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

LimeBike Takes Over! -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

All Star Weekend Highlights -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Chinese New Year Brought to SMHS -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

The Van Jones Show:Jay-Z -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Oroville Dam Crisis Continues to Worry Residents

Rain may be essential for California to end the five-year-long drought, but what happens if there is too much rain? In Oroville, California, the local dam is not agreeing to the continuous downpour. On Feb. 7, the dam’s main spillway, used for overflow, was damaged and the emergency spillway had to be operated as an alternative. Unfortunately, the emergency spillway didn’t fix the situation. As time went on, the dam began overflowing into the river below, causing chunks of earth to erode and risk the safety of the dam and the city of Oroville. The overflowing water continued to pour into the river below, and, if it overflowed, it would have flooded into Oroville and Sacramento. Five days after the main spillway’s failure, about 190,000 Oroville residents were asked to evacuate. If the dam did break, the water collected by it would be wasted and could cause water shortages in Northern and Southern California.

The Oroville Dam was built in the 1960s, and it failed a test in 2005 related to flooding. Federal officials ignored the failure and believed that the dam would be able to withstand the tested scenarios. Therefore, the dam was not improved when it should have been. According to the United States Army Corps of Engineers website, dams over the age of 50 years have fulfilled their lifespan. However, according to the chart on the site, by 2020, over 20,000 dams will be around 50-60 years old. In an article on Vox, called “The Crisis at Oroville Dam, explained, by Brad Plumer and Jenny Rowland, a federal official said that with the dams’ “increasing age and cost, the current state of dam infrastructure is poor.”

The main focus at the Oroville dam is to fix the main spillway so that rainwater can be contained safely within the dam. The plan is for workers to place rocks and stones into the holes of the main spillway to stop the flooding. The work is being done by air, using helicopters that transfer bags of rocks to the site. For damages that are accessible by road, dump trucks are transporting the repair supplies. In an article in the LA Times, called “Frantic Work Begins to Fix Oroville,” Chris Orrock said, “You’re putting rocks in a hole. Then you’re putting slurry in to solidify it.When water comes down, it will hit that patch and roll off.”

During the evacuation process of hundreds an increase in crime occurred. In the same LA Times article, police officers reported thatCody Bowles, 27, and Lucia Ripley, 31, carjacked the vehicle of an Oroville resident who was packing it to flee. The resident left the car running and was moving in and out of the house with items when the couple jumped into the vehicle.” In addition, on that same day, Teran Washington and a 16 year-old started shooting at a local market to steal goods within the store. The fight to fix the dam remains a top priority for the safety of Oroville and its residents.

graphic

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone