February 19, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

The Van Jones Show:Jay-Z -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Chris Bosh Possible Comeback -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Chloe Kim: The 17 Year Old Phenomenon -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Shaun White Wins Gold at Pyeongchang -

Friday, February 16, 2018

The Biggest Problems with the NBA All-Star Games -

Friday, February 16, 2018

History of Super Bowl -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Where would you take your date out on Valentine’s Day? -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Jeff Sessions’ History with Race Follows Him -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Crazy Trades During The NBA Trade Deadline -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

“Love, Simon” and representation on the Big Screen -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Contraceptive Coverage Rollback Endangers Women -

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Rape Accusation Made Against Former “Voice” Star -

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Should Confederate statues be taken down? -

Friday, February 2, 2018

John Aguilar: Ataque Rapido -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

“The Mini Show” -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

‘Coco’ captura corazones de todos -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

College Visits -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Viaje a Teotihuacán -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

R&B Comeback -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Why Megapixels aren’t the Whole Picture

The question “how many megapixels does it have” is many people’s easiest way to judge whether or not a phone camera or DSLR is competitive or not. There are many different factors that can contribute to camera quality, megapixels being only one of them. A megapixel is made up of one million pixels, and the more megapixels a camera has, the more detail it produces, meaning a larger picture. But what use do megapixels have? And what else makes a camera good, or not?

Think of megapixels as the size of a picture. For example, if there was a painting, the megapixels would be the total area of the canvas. The highest resolution displays on most smartphones these days have only about 4.2 million pixels, or 4.2 megapixels. Lower resolution displays, such as the iPhone 7, have only 1 million pixels. So, if you’re only taking pictures that you will view on your phone, 5 megapixels will be more than enough in most cases. If you want to take pictures for large prints, however, higher resolutions like 24 or even 36 megapixels may be ideal.

But as said above, megapixels are only the size of the image. What else determines whether a camera can be considered good or not? For smartphone cameras, one of the biggest factors is the phone’s post processing, or how your phone edits a picture immediately after you take it. For example, the physical sensor and optics in the iPhone 7 and 7+ may seem lacking compared to modern Android phones, but Apple’s excellent post processing makes up for the iPhone’s slightly inferior optics.

In some cases, however, post processing isn’t enough to save a picture. Sometimes a camera’s dynamic range simply can’t capture all of the colors in a scene. Dynamic range is how much detail your camera can capture in the brightest and darkest parts of a picture. The smaller sensor size in smartphone cameras, compared to DSLRs, severely affects how much dynamic range your smartphone camera has.

Smartphone companies realized that although post processing might not be able to recover the brightest or darkest parts of one image, they can combine multiple pictures and use the information from all of them. HDR mode takes multiple pictures, all at different exposures: some brighter, some darker. Your phone then combines the information from these pictures and stitches them together to make an image that has significantly more dynamic range than just one picture. Try it yourself! Go to an area where you can get dark shadows and the bright sky in the same picture. Shoot one picture in normal mode, and one with HDR on. You’ll see that the sky is not as blown out and the shadows are slightly brighter than on the first picture you took.

Take some time to figure out all the features of your camera. Even smartphone cameras these days are good enough in many situations – for example, I can take a clear picture of the Milky Way with my HTC 10. Smartphone cameras are geared towards convenience, giving you the power to quickly snap a picture whenever you want. But if you spend a little more time looking around menus and different modes, you may find something that pushes your smartphone or DSLR photography to the next level.  Don’t worry about megapixels, think about the other things that can make a camera great.

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