February 19, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

The Van Jones Show:Jay-Z -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Chris Bosh Possible Comeback -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Chloe Kim: The 17 Year Old Phenomenon -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Shaun White Wins Gold at Pyeongchang -

Friday, February 16, 2018

The Biggest Problems with the NBA All-Star Games -

Friday, February 16, 2018

History of Super Bowl -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Where would you take your date out on Valentine’s Day? -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Jeff Sessions’ History with Race Follows Him -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Crazy Trades During The NBA Trade Deadline -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

“Love, Simon” and representation on the Big Screen -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Contraceptive Coverage Rollback Endangers Women -

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Rape Accusation Made Against Former “Voice” Star -

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Should Confederate statues be taken down? -

Friday, February 2, 2018

John Aguilar: Ataque Rapido -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

“The Mini Show” -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

‘Coco’ captura corazones de todos -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

College Visits -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Viaje a Teotihuacán -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

R&B Comeback -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Jeff Sessions’ History with Race Follows Him

Jeff Sessions is well-known as the controversial Attorney General of the Trump Administration. Before being nominated for the role he serves currently, heading the Department of Justice of the United States, Mr. Sessions was a Senator representing Alabama. He was also the first Senator to support Donald Trump for President. But, to understand Jeff Sessions’ importance, we must look into his history with racial issues in this country.

Mr. Sessions’ relations to racial issues entered the political debate far before President Trump did. In 1986, President Ronald Reagan nominated Jeff Sessions for the position of Federal Judge. To hold that position, you must be nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Mr. Sessions was ultimately rejected for this role based on his racial comments.

Jeff Sessions testified twice in front of the Senate, according to NPR. The first set of hearings occured in March, and the second in April. Between these two times, his testimony changed greatly.

In March of 1986, Mr. Sessions testified that he knew that Jim Blackshear, a white civil rights attorney, was called a “disgrace to his race.” A lawyer who had worked with Sessions at the time claimed that Mr. Sessions had agreed with that characterization of Blackshear. During the testimony Mr. Sessions gave in April, he claimed that he had never acknowledged those comments.

In that earlier March hearing, he admitted that he once said that multiple institutions, including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), were communist-inspired and “un-American.” At this same hearing, he also commented that this same statement was wrong. At the second hearing, he decided to ignore ever making such a comment, and stated his denial of his previous claims.

Likely the most famous quote from Jeff Sessions regarding race is: “I thought those members of the Ku Klux Klan were OK until I learned they smoked pot.” Mr. Sessions has admitted to making this statement, which shows support for the actions of the KKK, but only jokingly. In defense, he said that he made the statement only because the idea of him supporting the Klan was so ridiculous. Regardless, many people, including some Senators, still found it unacceptable.

Mr. Sessions has continually restated his support for civil rights in Alabama. He also points out that, as a prosecutor, he has gone after the Ku Klux Klan. However, certain comments, like the ones above and several others, can’t be simply ignored when looking at Jeff Sessions important as a whole. Being racist in the past is still racism, and it is still important.

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