December 16, 2019

With Christmas Comes Nostalgia -

Monday, December 9, 2019

November Book Recommendations -

Monday, December 9, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

California Flu Crisis

     The Golden State is currently experiencing what could be one of its most deadly flu seasons in the past decade.

     Since the beginning of the season, the number of flu-related deaths has risen to 165 people-eight times the number seen at this time last year, according to recent figures released by state public health officials. The state doesn’t collect data on deaths among people over the age of 65 though, meaning that the actual death toll of flu related deaths could be much higher.

     California hospitals have been packed in the past few weeks, with doctors struggling to treat the swell of flu patients that have flooded hospital emergency rooms. In the Bay Area, hospitals and health clinics are calling on nurses and staff members to work extra shifts and placing restrictions on visitors to help prevent further spreading of the virus. Over-the-counter medicines are in high demand and are flying off of shelves, while retailers are rushing to restock them.

     For most people, getting the flu means being miserable for a few days. For the elderly, young children and people with chronic illnesses or weak immune systems, the flu can be deadly. According to WebMD.com, getting the flu can lead to pneumonia and dehydration, a combination that can result in death if not treated properly.

     This flu season, the dominant flu strain in circulation is H3N2, a subtype of the influenza A virus. Experts say that H3N2 is a particularly dangerous strain, as it is more vaccine-resistant than the others. H3N2 “tends to cause more deaths and more hospitalizations than the other strains,” said Dr. Jeffrey Gunzenhauser, L.A. County’s interim health officer to the LA Times. H3N2 is particularly known to cause severe illness among young children and older people.

  While vaccinated people are still at risk, the flu shot can help lessen the severity of symptoms for people who get the flu. “It’s still really the best way to protect yourself from flu, and also to protect the vulnerable people around you,” says Dr. Cora Hoover of the San Francisco Department of Public Health.

     Sick people should also stay at home and recover instead of going to work or attending school, to prevent further spreading of the virus. It is important to recover first instead of getting others sick and overexerting yourself.       

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