September 22, 2019

Increased Regulation is Necessary for Homeschooling -

Thursday, August 29, 2019

An amazing year for the wrestling team -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

My Experience at the Women’s March -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

El Regreso Del Racismo -

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Parkland Shooting -

Friday, March 2, 2018

California Flu Crisis -

Friday, March 2, 2018

‘Rapping’ Up the Grammy Awards -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

¿Cuál Será el Futuro de DACA? -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Peters traded to the Rams -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018 Upcoming Movies -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Instagram-Worthy Desserts of San Francisco -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Upcoming Season of Baseball -

Monday, February 26, 2018

Black History Month -

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Black Panther Review -

Friday, February 23, 2018

The Destructive Culture of Social Media -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Badminton season launches into action! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

LimeBike Takes Over! -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

All Star Weekend Highlights -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Chinese New Year Brought to SMHS -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

San Mateo Volleyball Season Kicks Off -

Friday, February 16, 2018

Increased Regulation is Necessary for Homeschooling

Though school may tend not to be the most anticipated event in our life, our choices for where to attend are often limited. Private schools are available to some, but many charge steep tuition. Homeschooling, though it is an appealing idea, is unreliable in regulating the standards of education its students receive. If homeschooling is to be considered a viable option for education, it needs a severe increase in regulations. 

According to the Coalition for Responsible Home Education, only twelve states have academic assessments to provide accountability. With a growing number of students being homeschooled nationwide, the requirements to assess the abilities of those students need to be strong. If there are thirty-eight states with inefficient regulations, that’s thirty-eight states where homeschooling is not a viable option.

In general, homeschooling laws fall into two categories: under the private school regulations or under homeschooling statutes. In California, where it falls under the private school umbrella, students are required to attend at least three hours a day for 175 days each year by a private tutor. However, in states like Michigan, parents only need to tell the state that they disagree with public teachings on a religious basis, and don’t even need a teaching degree to remove their child from public schooling. Students homeschooled in states like Michigan don’t even have to get tested to ensure that they’re learning. 

We have a standard of public education that everyone should follow, and unregulated options for education defeat the purpose of holding our students and educators to such a standard. We standardize education to ensure that the future generations of Americans are prepared to attend higher levels of education and enter the workforce prepared. For students in Michigan and other unregulated states, we cannot ensure that students are well prepared. Homeschooling needs to be an option. Due to medical or geographical issues, many students cannot attend a public school. This option still needs to be available to them, but it still needs to be reliable. If the state government cannot be trusted to ensure this standard of education, the federal government needs to step in. Without a well-educated student body, we cannot ensure a progressive and productive future that furthers the success and prowess of our country. We need federal regulations that assess the quality of education that homeschooled students receive. 

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