December 8, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

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Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

How Media Affects The Mind -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Matilda Provides Hope -

Monday, October 14, 2019

#AHistoryofBadBoycotts

#BoycottOliveGarden started trending on Twitter after false rumors about political donations spread in late August 2019.

With the rise of cancel culture in social media and society, it has become increasingly more common for brands and/or people to be “canceled” by certain groups of people.  Cancel culture is the phenomenon of when a certain person, group, or organization does something a group of people or a society of a whole find unacceptable; a large group of people then stop supporting said person, group, or organization financially, morally, or digitally

Some of these “cancellings” are warranted and beneficial towards a certain movement or ideology such as the backlash towards Harvey Weinstein and his movies due to sexual harassment allegations against him.  This case had proof behind it and by avoiding Weinstein movies, one advocates for more appropriate behavior in the film industry. However, the majority of these occurrences do not have substantial evidence behind them and end up hurting the subject being boycotted without warrant.

A recent example of this is the controversy with the restaurant branch Olive Garden.  After allegations of the chain making donations to president Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, many liberal-leaning users had taken to Twitter and got the hashtag #BoycottOliveGarden trending. Users made tweets such as “I will never eat at Olive Garden again. By supporting Mr. Trump you are condoning racism, sexism, and xenophobia.”  Although these are valid concerns and opinions, Olive Garden never really made any donations or showed any support. The company took to Twitter to explain that they “don’t know where this information came from, but it is incorrect. [Their] company does not donate to presidential candidates.” This situation really goes to show how quickly people can be to cancel or boycott without doing proper research first on if the situation is true.  A false rumor can sometimes go a long way.

Maybe one of the first situations that comes to mind for many is the conflict between YouTubers and social media influencers Tati Westbrook and James Charles.  After Tati’s first video was uploaded condemning James Charles’ actions, millions were quick to unsubscribe from him and instead follow Tati. Now although many quick to believe Westbrook and cancel James, once he made a video defending himself, people were even quicker to jump ship and believe James again.  James Charles was quick to regain all the subscribers he lost and even gain more than what he started with. The mob mentality that many have regarding situations of canceling people can be toxic especially since proper research and reflection can be ignored in the process.

Many of these instances are very similar in that people are quick to believe whatever information is given to them regardless of the source.  In addition to this, the mob mentality many have where if a large majority of people are in support of something that it must be true/right leads the subject of these boycotts to be unfairly punished.  It’s fairly certain that there will be many more bad boycotts to come but with knowledge of these previous ones, we can work to make smarter choices in deciding how to react to them.

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