November 17, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

How Media Affects The Mind -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Matilda Provides Hope -

Monday, October 14, 2019

Matilda Provides Hope

From the outside, Matilda the Musical is just another fun story made into an even more entertaining show. Running from October 17 to October 20, it includes all the classic elements—show-stopping numbers, incredible sets and protagonists you can root for—but this year, SMHS’ fall musical has much more to it than that. Underlying the fun hijinx are empowering messages that are equally important for the high schoolers at SMHS as they are for the primary schoolers at Crunchem Hall.  

At the beginning of the show, we meet Matilda Wormwood, a little girl who’s known her parents hate her since the day she was born. She can’t help but feel stuck in her own story, abhorred by her parents and ignored by the rest of the world. In order to escape, she turns to her local library, throwing herself into books and stories, and, through her love of books, finds strength she never thought she could have. When the time comes for her to go to school, she brings that strength with her, sharing it with students and teachers alike. 

The show brings issues of bullying and abuse into the limelight, not only between children, but also between adults. The musical aims to show just how much these issues can affect people, but highlights that when faced with them, they can be overcome, if you’re willing to ask for help. “I see Matilda as an inspiring character,” says Katie Maupin, who plays Matilda, “because, especially as a young girl, you don’t see many girls rising up from these – for lack of a better word – abusive situations. So to see her rise above it and overcome these dire circumstances, it’s really inspiring.” 

The show doesn’t leave any doubt as to what its message is, stating it loud and clear in the song “Naughty”:  “Just because you find that life’s not fair, it doesn’t mean that you just have to grin and bear it. If you always take it on the chin and wear it, you might as well be saying, you think that it’s okay, and that’s not right.” The show asks audience members not to be complicit to the horrors they perceive, and instead to look at their lives, find out what’s wrong and fix it. It especially stresses how important this is for young people, stating that, “Even if you’re little, you can do a lot. You mustn’t let a little thing like little stop you.” This emphasis is especially poignant in a show performed and crewed entirely by teenagers. 

Those participating in the show are also working to make change more directly, through a partnership with the Ronald McDonald House. “All kids have troubles, but some children struggle with the possibility of never getting to grow up,” says Brad Friedman, the show’s director. “I wanted to use our production of Matilda to highlight the amazing work that Ronald McDonald House in Palo Alto is doing to support families of seriously ill children.”  From this desire, the “When I Grow Up” Campaign was born, which hopes to motivate people to give generously to the Ronald McDonald House. Those involved will also ask all donors to fill out a card for the lobby of the PAC, talking about what they hope to be when they grow up in order to highlight the campaign. 

Those involved with the show hope that it will inspire people to work to make change, both in their communities and on larger scales. Pretty good for a show about a bookworm, huh? 

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