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A Personal Account On Vaping -

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A Personal Account On Vaping

WEATHERFORD, T.X.- Tryston Zohfeld, 17, is recovering after nearly three weeks of being in the Intensive Care Unit due to vaping, doctors conclude. 

On July 26, the 17 year old was fighting for his life as his seemingly healthy and athletic lungs suddenly failed. Tryston told ABC News, “When I woke up I was throwing up everywhere, and my heart felt like it was beating out of my chest going 100 miles per hour.” 

Tryston was rushed to Cook Children’s hospital and was immediately admitted to the ICU where he was put into a medically induced coma as his condition rapidly deteriorated. Doctors ordered tests, including a chest x-ray which showed a complete blockage, but it was unknown what the cause was. They ran tests for many diseases, even pneumonia, but everything came back negative. 

“We eliminated everything that we could possibly think of that caused it,” Pediatric Pulmonologist   Karen Shulz told ABC news.

It was then that his cousin told doctors Tryston had been vaping since the 8th grade. “It all started to make sense why we weren’t finding anything,” his father, Matt Zohfeld, recalled. 

Dr. Schulz and her team believe that the unknown chemicals Tryston inhaled caused inflammation in his lungs to the point where they couldn’t exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide anymore. 18 days after admission and 30 pounds lighter, tryston was discharged from the hospital. He is now warning other teens against the risk, telling them the consequences are not worth it. 

Zohfeld later added, “As soon as I got home, my friends and I threw away all of our devices. My ICU experience was a severe but necessary warning to my friends and myself. I want it to be a warning for other teenagers as well, nobody should have to experience what I went through.”  

Tryston is only one of around 450 reported cases of lung failure linked to e-cigarette use. In addition, the CDC is investigating 127 cases of seizures and other neurological symptoms also potentially linked to vaping. As of September 6, 2019, there have been five deaths across the US as a result of pulmonary disease sparked by e-cigarette use.

It seems as though every morning, the national news has yet another case of vaping-related lung disease to report. Despite the ongoing hospitalizations, news stories and other warnings, the number of people who use e cigarettes has not dropped. 

Tryston’s story and all of the others that continue to surface should be a huge wake up call to High School students around the Bay Area and the United States. Stop vaping. 

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