November 17, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

How Media Affects The Mind -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Matilda Provides Hope -

Monday, October 14, 2019

How Media Affects The Mind

We absorb a lot of new information everyday.

The media is an almost all encompassing word that describes a massive variety of things that we as a society are exposed to everyday. Social media and televised news connects us all in a way that lets us see and interact with each other all around the globe. Video games and movies give us a temporary escape from reality, placing us in someone else’s shoes and allowing us to experience another person’s life vicariously through a screen. However, when does constant exposure to different kinds of media begin to change a person and shape the way they think? 

In a study measuring social media influence on individuals with and without psychosis by Natalie Berry, it was found that social media can have positive and negative effects depending on how one utilizes it. Individuals who vented on social media and individuals who perceived themselves as lower in social rank had worse self-esteem, mood and paranoia, while those who posted about daily activities had higher self-esteem, a better mood and less paranoia. Although psychosis patients were supposed to be the ones being tested, they found little discernible difference between psychosis subjects and control subjects. The study suffers, however, from its mostly correlational research method. “Instagram does boost my mood because I follow many inspirational accounts,” says Rachel Liu, a junior, “but it also is a big time waster, as it is good at sucking people in.” 

Another study by Jolie Wormwood searched for the effects of media coverage on mass violence on normal individuals. Television news stations have a lot of influence on how people see a certain event, or whether the event is known at all. As more stations cover the same incident, more people will likely hear of it. The experiment involved 91 subjects who recently heard about the Boston Marathon Bombings. They recorded their eye blinking reactivity to images and sample articles of the bombings and their perceptive ability to distinguish between armed and unarmed individuals to measure how startled they were, while also recording their self reported distress. They found that the negative tone of some of the articles the subjects read had a significant effect on their mental health, causing them to feel more distressed and paranoid. When asked about his opinion on media coverage for recent mass shootings David Gu, a junior, had this to say, “To be blunt, media doesn’t cover shootings the best. They don’t really take the seriousness of shootings as heavily because for them it’s really just another piece of news that they can use.” He remembers being constantly reminded of this issue by news outlets every day. “This desensitizes me from shootings because it just feels like ‘oh, another shooting.’ That sucks.”

The long term psychological effects of gaming on an individual has been debated heavily by politicians, researchers and gamers alike. Results and conclusions vary as one finding by Yunqiang Wang noticed that violent games can leave a lasting impression on youth, causing them to be more aggressive, while another study by Andre Dowsett and Mervyn Jackson found that the aggression is caused by the competitive nature of the game and not the violence within it. There have been many numerous studies conducted to test the hypothesis that violent video game play has a long term effect on adolescents and adults, but often it is countered by other researchers who say the tests use unrelated criteria to prove a point. “Once I got hooked, I got hooked for the entirety of middle school,” says Teddy Pei, a senior who played video games in the past, “I don’t think it gave me violent tendencies.” Landon Matsuo, another senior who currently plays games like “The Division” and “Halo,” says, “Playing video games helps me calm down…. They’re just fun, it lets me take out my creative side.” He describes video games as art, “There’s sometimes beauty in the scenery of a game. I remember in the game ‘Dark Souls’ there’s a lot of violence, but there’s a certain beauty to the graphics and levels.”

Based on the hundreds of studies done on different forms of media, it can be concluded that each of them does have an effect on a society. Whether or not it’s for the better or worse is a discussion that currently has no conclusion. Each form of media comes with its own benefits and problems that are unclear to us at the moment. For now, “Game of Thrones,” Instagram, “Call of Duty” and CNN will still be popular topics of discussion amongst fans and researchers alike.

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone