December 10, 2019

With Christmas Comes Nostalgia -

Monday, December 9, 2019

November Book Recommendations -

Monday, December 9, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back

California high schools, including ours, will soon be forced to start school after 8:30 a.m. The legislation (Senate Bill 328), signed by Gavin Newsom on October 13, requires schools to implement the new start times by the 2022-23 school year. Unfortunately, this means that most current sophomores, juniors, and seniors will no longer be attending high school by the time this law is put into effect. This law only applies to public and charter schools, excluding some rural districts.

The reason people feel that school start times need to be pushed back is because students are not getting enough sleep, causing their overall well-being and academic performance to decrease. Studies show that teens need eight to 10 hours of sleep every night, but in reality most teenagers actually get around seven hours.

Organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that all middle and high schools should begin at or later than 8:30 a.m. But according to a 2015 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than four out of five public middle and high schools start earlier than the aforementioned time.

State Senator Anthony Portantino, who wrote the bill, says that when start times are pushed back, “productivity goes up because suspensions go down. Disruptive behavior goes down, tardies go down, violent behavior goes down.”

Kevin Lai, a freshman here at SMHS, states that he usually gets about 7 hours of sleep each night, and that sometimes he “feels super tired which makes it hard for [him] to pay attention.” Similarly, freshman Nick Kitahata explained to me that “having later start times will help [him] complete [his] homework without having to worry about being super tired the next day.”

When asked about the law, Ethnic Studies teacher Mr. Banuelos said that he was “okay with it, as long as [students] aren’t [at school] longer.” He further explained to me that, similarly to students, he will benefit from being able to catch a few more winks.

As with any law, there are people who oppose it. Last year, former Governor Jerry Brown vetoed similar legislation, writing in his September 20th, 2018 veto message that “these are the types of decisions best handled in the local community.” Many people agree with former Governor Brown that this law is not “one-size-fits-all” and that start times should be handled by individual districts. Some opposers of this bill include the California Teachers Association, school boards, and California School Administrators. They argue that the later start times might negatively impact before and after-school programs, sports programs and bus schedules. Another opinion is that parents with set schedules will still end up dropping their kids off at the same time that they did before, which would defeat the entire purpose of the bill. But, this is why this bill is going into effect in three years, which will hopefully be enough time for people to adjust.

Will this law be successful and improve student performance and well-being? We will have to wait three more years, but hopefully it can meet that goal.

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