December 10, 2019

With Christmas Comes Nostalgia -

Monday, December 9, 2019

November Book Recommendations -

Monday, December 9, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports

While for many Bearcats the imminent close of their Senior Fall season will mark the end of their athletic career, some may not be quite ready to part with the sports they love and have dedicated themselves to for so many years. From the most intense and rigorous Division I programs in the country to relaxed, just-for-fun intramural athletics, there are scores of options out there for people to continue their athletic endeavours at the college level. 

For the more competitive among us, many schools of all sizes all around the country have league-affiliated NCAA, National Collegiate Athletic Association, teams in a wide variety of sports. This is the highest tier of college athletic competition, and while it will require a good deal of training, even among the teams of the NCAA there is a good range of commitment levels and options available, each with their own pros and cons. While an NCAA Division I school, for instance, will most certainly provide the most gruelling practice schedules, demanding workouts, toughest competition and most difficult admissions, they also have many more resources available for their student athletes. The  athletes at these kinds of schools are the all-stars: they are the ones that you would most often see playing on TV, the ones most likely to go into a career as an athlete, and the ones getting large, often full scholarships to the schools they represent.

On the other end of the NCAA spectrum, however, Division III schools still offer a good deal of competition and intensity at a level that is slightly more approachable and less all-consuming than that of higher-division schools. While these schools are technically not allowed to provide explicitly sports-affiliated scholarships to its student-athletes, applying to a school in this division with the intention of playing for them will be a significant aid in getting in if you seem to be a valuable asset to them. 

Another perk of choosing to pursue college athletics at a slightly lower level is the amount of commitment required: for many, a Division II or III school that will allow its student-athletes to have more time to direct towards their academics and other aspects of their school- or social-lives are significantly more appealing to those who do not want to have their lives completely dominated by their sport. 

As appealing as college athletics may seem, for many the road to recruitment is difficult to navigate. Often we think of the stereotypical, high school movie-esque image of a mysterious recruiter turning up at the big game and offering the star player the deal of a lifetime. In actuality, for many recruitment is a long and complicated process that often must be initiated by the student rather than the college coaches. 

“It’s never too early to start thinking about where you would like to play, and which colleges are the most appropriate for you,” says USA Today High School Sports. “NCAA Division I is not the only or even the best option.  You can find an athletic scholarship in most sports at the NCAA Division II, NAIA and junior college levels.”

While the process may be long and the competition rough, the opportunity presented by college athletics are promising ones that anyone interested in competing after high school should consider. 

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someone