January 28, 2020

With Christmas Comes Nostalgia -

Monday, December 9, 2019

November Book Recommendations -

Monday, December 9, 2019

SMHS Mateobotics Gears Up for the Season -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Leap from High School to College Sports -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Mateo Comes up Short: 2019 Little Big Game -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

The Master of Self-Deprecating Humor -

Thursday, November 14, 2019

How Old is “Too Old” for Trick-or-Treating? -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

We Need to Get Serious About Shootings -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

How Boyan Slat Is Helping Solve The Great Pacific Garbage Patch -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Youtube’s Yankovic turned Chinese TikTok Star: Bart Baker -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

#TeamTrees -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Varsity Football -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

CA Bill Pushes School Start Times Back -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Why the Empire Strikes Back is the best Star Wars movie -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Pros and Cons of Energy Drinks -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Movies to Watch during Halloween -

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Bearcats Strike for Climate -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

A Personal Account On Vaping -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Girls Water Polo Resumes Winning Ways -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Running into the 2019 season -

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

November Book Recommendations

Carina Halcolb’s Recommendations: 

“And Then There Were None” by Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie’s “And Then There Were None” is a classic murder mystery novel following 10 strangers invited to a private island by a reclusive millionaire, who only share one thing: a wicked past they’ll hide until their last breath. Much of the intrigue of the novel comes from the fact that you know that all the characters are going to die from the beginning. “You learn pretty quickly that the order and method of each character’s death follows the structure of a children’s poem, leaving you with an entertaining guessing game of when and how each character will die,” says Carina Halcomb, an SMHS alumni now studying at Northeastern. This thrilling who-dun-it is perfect for mystery fans, and an Agatha Christie staple. 

“An Absolutely Remarkable Thing” by Hank Green

Hank Green’s long-awaited debut novel, “An Absolutely Remarkable Thing,” tells the story of a 23 year old grad student, April May, whose accidental discovery of an alien statue turned her into an overnight celebrity. Thrown into the spotlight, April is forced to deal with its consequences on her relationships, her safety and her identity, all while the world descends into chaos over the presence of these newfound “Carls.” The book touches on prejudices surrounding and within the queer community, and “shows both the worst and best of humanity, as well as the best and worst of social media,” says Carina. This immediate #1 New York Times Bestseller has been praised for its ability to “shift boulders in your soul,” despite being a sci-fi comedy, and it’s highly recommended to anyone looking for novels with LGBT+ characters, nerdy references or simply a fun read. 

Mr. Pirie’s Recommendations:

“Our Man In Havana” by Graham Greene 

“Our Man in Havana” follows James Wormold, a vacuum salesman living in Havana, who gets dragged into the British secret service after falling on hard times. Lacking any actual intelligence, he uses newspaper clippings and a series of fabricated agents to create reports to send back to London, and, through his attempts to make a living wage, manages to cause a situation eerily similar to the Cuban Missile Crisis. Shockingly, while the novel appears to mirror the events of the crisis, it came out in 1958, predating and anticipating it by four years. Written by a retired member of MI6, the book is “an espionage thriller, a penetrating character study and a political satire that still resonates to this day.”

“CivilWarLand in Bad Decline” by George Saunders

“CivilWarLand in Bad Decline” compiles a series of six short stories and a novella written by George Saunders, each centering around people trying to survive in an increasingly crazed world. The story the bind-up is named for is the tale of a civil war themed theme park, “and the people and ghosts who inhabit said theme park,” says Mr. Pirie. The story is told from the perspective of a park employee who’s seeing the park decline before his eyes, when a new addition to the team, a violent, ex-soldier hired as a security guard, begins to make things far more interesting. The New York Times praises Saunders’ works, saying that, “Saunders’s satiric vision of America is dark and demented; it’s also ferocious and very funny.” Mr. Pirie states that, “you’ll laugh, you’ll cry, etc.” and recommends the novel to, “civil war enthusiasts, civil war reenactors, survivalists, ghosts, fans of ghosts, friends of ghosts, ghost families, Tacko Fall, and Bhavik Joshi.” 

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